September 15, 2008

Leaving India - reflections on Koenig Solutions, The Willows Bank Hotel, Shimla, Delhi etc

Leaving India tomorrow for Krakow and beyond. As I'm unlikely to do anything sober in eastern europe, I thought I would write up my experiences of IT training in India with Koenig Solutions (www.koenig-solutions.com), as this might be interesting to other people thinking of doing the same.

Delhi - CCNA

I did CCNA in Delhi. Koenig's approach to CCNA is in general excellent. I spent a lot of time hands on with the Cisco kit and the majority of the teaching is done on a white board by the teacher. The centre in Delhi is fine, and adequately equipped. I didn't care much for the lunch arrangements, so, like half a dozen other people, and some of the Koenig staff, I usually had lunch next door at 'Haldirams'. If you don't mind vegeterian, and you like Indian food, Haldirams is absolutely superb.

The main problem with Delhi is that when you've finished training for the day, it's impossible to relax. It is incredibly noisy, fiercely hot and very dirty. I enjoyed Delhi the last time I was there as a tourist but I couldn't hack studying there again.

To be fair, some other people really liked Delhi. A couple of the younger guys were on a mission to go out clubbing whenever possible, which was reportedly brilliant. Some people insulated themselves from Delhi by staying at the five star Siddharth hotel, which I've had a look round. It is really nice but REALLY expensive. I've stayed a couple of nights at The Clark Heights hotel. I can't fault Clark Heights really - the staff are great and the rooms are immaculate with wifi and big flat screen TVs and nice bathrooms. Unfortunately the neighborhood is very noisy. Reports of the appartments and cheap hotels were mixed.

Shimla - MCSE

Shimla was an enormous relief after Delhi. The climate is much like the UK. Koenig have two training centres - Centre 1 is in downtown 'San Jauli'. I only went there for exams. The majority of students are at Centre 1. Centre 2 is 1km from centre 1, up a steep hill and into the jungle. The setting is superb. Very quiet, nice views and a good place to concentrate on studying. This is also where some of Koenig's appartments are. Personally I wouldn't recommend the appartments, especially if you're likely to be intimidated by monkeys, which are everywhere.

I stayed at Willow Banks hotel, which was generally fine. I didn't like their food, especially breakfast, and the wifi was constantly on the blink, but the rooms are nice, and very big. They've got a small gym and a 12ft snooker table. Some people moved out of Willow Banks to go to The Combemere. The Combemere is slightly more expensive but has some definite advantages - according to my friend who stayed there for a couple of months the gym was much better equipped, the breakfast was nicer (and included in the price) and the wifi worked consistently. The rooms are smaller than Willow Banks but more modern. The Combemere also own Cafe Sol, which is the best place in Shimla for non-Indian/Chinese food. Koenig's 'new' appartments looked pretty reasonable. Similar to staying at student's shared house in the UK. Large rooms, limited hot water in the morning.

Shimla was pretty dead in terms of night life. The Combemere has a night club but it's usually empty because there's a very steep cover charge unless you're a guest or friend of a guest.

MCSE is a long slog. You have to do at least seven exams. Everyone seems to get through it, even people with no IT experience. The Koenig approach to teaching MCSE is to just go through the Microsoft Learning official courses. There's a problem with this. The Microsoft learning courses are well organised and cover a lot of material, but they're deadly boring. When you have to go through seven courses in a row it starts to feel like you're sitting through the powerpoint presentation from hell. About a month into the course myself and my tutor agreed to abandon this approach so he improvised his own teaching method which was based more on hands-on problem solving. This worked much beter for me. One thing Koenig was very good at was adapting to individual needs, assuming you had booked individual tuition. There was a dutch guy who was unhappy with his CCNP teacher who complained to the administrator, and next day, hey presto - new teacher (and CCIE qualified!). Of course, if you don't ask, you don't get.

If I did long term training in India again I'd be tempted to go to Goa for a better balance of holiday and study. If I was going just to do a short term intensive course I'd consider Dehradun, which is supposed to be very well equipped with zero distractions.

August 19, 2008

The most useful command in IT

BORINGNESS WARNING! [This entry is of no interest to anyone who is not an IT professional]

I wish I'd known this before. Works on Windows 2003, probably on 2000 server too. Diagnose any network problem!

netsh ras diag show all type=file destination=c:\output compression=disable

August 15, 2008

Calculating Pi to 8 decimal places using Pythagoras's Theorem

"BORINGNESS WARNING [The following entry is of no interest to anyone who "can't do maths"]

I'm pretty bored. It's been raining on and off, but mainly on, for the last week in Shimla. There's nothing to do here when it rains except stay in the hotel and read. Other than computer manuals, I've been reading A Passage to India and also The Joy of Numbers, which I found in the second hand bookshop. The maths book is by someone called Shankuntala Devi who was a celebrity mathematician in India during the 80s. According to the book, Archimedes declared Pi to have a value between 3 1/7 and 3 10/7.
Monumentally bored of exam revision, I decided to see if I could calculate Pi myself. Approximating a circle as being composed of 'n' isosceles triangles, I found that:
pi=n*sin(180/n)
which is very accurate for a large values of n. It occurred to me that if Archimedes tried to derive pi on his own, he probably didn't know how to calculate 'sin', so I tried to come up with an expression for 'sin'. I could remember seeing an iterative equation for 'sin' at university, but I couldn't remember what it was and after several hours gave up trying to work it out. I went to sleep that night feeling a little disappointed that I couldn't do ancient mathematics without sinning.
This morning I had another go at it, and decided to forget about 'sin' and use only Pythagoras's. Theorem. After about eight pages of scribbling I solved it:
pi=n*bn
where bn is 0.5 * base of an isoceles triangle formed when approximating a circle of radius 1 as n triangles, and
bn=0.5*sqrt[2-(2*sqrt[1-bn-12]]
Using n=4 as a starting point (a square bounded by a circle) and b=sqrt[2] (from simple geometry) I managed to get pi=3.14 after 4 iterations:

1st iteration - n=4, b=sqrt2, pi=2.82
2nd iteration - n=8, b=0.38, pi=3.06
3rd iteration - n=16, b=0.2, pi=3.12
4th iteration - n=32, b=0.1, pi=3.14



Enlarge diagram (in new window)



So, a circle modelled as 32 isoceles triangles gives pi=3.14. This requires quite a lot of paper to work out all the intermediate calulations (especially if you have to calculate all the square roots by hand - I used Windows calculator instead).
I used a spreadsheet to continue the calculations. This gives, for a circle consisting of 32768 triangles, pi= 3.14159265 which is accurate to 8 decimal places.
According to The Joy of Numbers, Ludolph van Ceulen, a german presumably, calculated pi to 35 decimal places in the 16th century without a spreadsheet. He presumably used a more elegant mathematical method, but it would still have taken a ridiculous degree of patience to do accurately. Perhaps he was in Shimla at the time.

July 31, 2008

Knol

Today I published my first Knol.

Here it is:

How to find out if your computer has a virus.

I've got quite a bit to say about Knol, but not now. It's nearly 2am and I've got a class on a very boring subject (AD Group Policy) in the morning . :-(

July 24, 2008

First week in Shimla

I'm in Shimla, India, staying at the Willows Bank Hotel on The Mall. It's not a bad place - clean and comfy rooms with wireless Internet. Someone pokes a newspaper under my door every morning before I wake up and tidies my room while I'm out. I can't say I care much for the catering but have managed to ensure an acceptable breakfast in the morning by specifying two boiled eggs cooked for 6 minutes.

There's a gym downstairs which I've used twice and is basically okay and should ensure that I don't balloon whilst staying here for the next two months. The most disappointing aspect of my location is that so far I've been unable to find anywhere to play tennis so far and consequently the racket that I brought from England lies dormant in the cupboard.

June 19, 2008

Started blogging today

And all I could think of writing was 'lorem ipsum'.

Hello world...